Theme
12:16pm July 24, 2014
so-personal:

everything personal♡

so-personal:

everything personal♡

3:33pm July 22, 2014

canisalbus:

Today I remembered those animal themed card stock masks we used to make at library’s children’s centre at the age of… 9, 10 maybe?  Thus I whipped up this. Now I’m a jackal.

3:24pm July 22, 2014
worddocs:

Dreams are overdone, this is true, and a lot of people—myself included—do cringe a little bit when an author uses dreams in a story. However, the use of dreams is not the core problem; it’s the cliches that come with writing dreams that irritate people.
Most of the time, when someone writes a dream, they make it seem very clear. The dreamer knows what is going on at all times, there is a logical progression, they can tell when something is wrong, etc. If you really think about dreams that you’ve had before, there usually isn’t much logic involved. One moment you could be looking at a salad and the next moment, it’s your best friend from grade school dressed in a lettuce outfit, and you don’t question it at all.
We don’t remember most of our dreams. Unless you are writing your dreams down or immediately telling them to someone else, you’re going to forget them entirely. Within the first five minutes after waking, we forget almost all of what we dreamed the night before. In writing, a huge cliche is for characters to remember their dreams with perfect clarity. This just doesn’t happen unless, as stated above, you’ve done something to try to retain the memory of the dream.
If you are going to use dreams as a major portion of your story, you need to try to convey how dreams really are. They should be chaotic, things should randomly appear and disappear, things that don’t necessarily have anything to do with your story can happen in order to make the dream feel real. Your audience should be able to see the purpose of the dream sequence—in this case, showing your captive character—but they should also get the erratic, belly-twisting feeling of having a dream that’s not quite right.
Let your characters forget what happened. Maybe they have the same dream a second night, or a third night in a row. If you have a character that writes their dreams down, you need to establish their reasons for doing it. They might be trying to get lucid dreams, or they might be in therapy, or they might be a writer, a poet, or just someone interested in dreams. Whatever their reasons are, they need to have them. You need to let the audience know so that their journaling is part of their personality, not just a plot device.
It’s not that dreams themselves are overdone in writing, it’s that they’re not written as dreams. If you’re going to use them as a plot device, you need to ground them in reality—as much as dreams can be considered reality. They need to read like dreams, feel like dreams, and your characters need to react to them in a realistic way.
- Dr. M

worddocs:

Dreams are overdone, this is true, and a lot of people—myself included—do cringe a little bit when an author uses dreams in a story. However, the use of dreams is not the core problem; it’s the cliches that come with writing dreams that irritate people.

Most of the time, when someone writes a dream, they make it seem very clear. The dreamer knows what is going on at all times, there is a logical progression, they can tell when something is wrong, etc. If you really think about dreams that you’ve had before, there usually isn’t much logic involved. One moment you could be looking at a salad and the next moment, it’s your best friend from grade school dressed in a lettuce outfit, and you don’t question it at all.

We don’t remember most of our dreams. Unless you are writing your dreams down or immediately telling them to someone else, you’re going to forget them entirely. Within the first five minutes after waking, we forget almost all of what we dreamed the night before. In writing, a huge cliche is for characters to remember their dreams with perfect clarity. This just doesn’t happen unless, as stated above, you’ve done something to try to retain the memory of the dream.

If you are going to use dreams as a major portion of your story, you need to try to convey how dreams really are. They should be chaotic, things should randomly appear and disappear, things that don’t necessarily have anything to do with your story can happen in order to make the dream feel real. Your audience should be able to see the purpose of the dream sequence—in this case, showing your captive character—but they should also get the erratic, belly-twisting feeling of having a dream that’s not quite right.

Let your characters forget what happened. Maybe they have the same dream a second night, or a third night in a row. If you have a character that writes their dreams down, you need to establish their reasons for doing it. They might be trying to get lucid dreams, or they might be in therapy, or they might be a writer, a poet, or just someone interested in dreams. Whatever their reasons are, they need to have them. You need to let the audience know so that their journaling is part of their personality, not just a plot device.

It’s not that dreams themselves are overdone in writing, it’s that they’re not written as dreams. If you’re going to use them as a plot device, you need to ground them in reality—as much as dreams can be considered reality. They need to read like dreams, feel like dreams, and your characters need to react to them in a realistic way.

- Dr. M

3:02pm July 22, 2014

ahoy-ladymagenta:

odditiesoflife:

The Real Abandoned Overlook Hotel

Unlike the fictional Overlook Hotel in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, this hotel is really named the Overlook. The abandoned hotel is located in the small, wine growing town of Bernkastel-Kues in Germany. Aside from the fact that it has been unoccupied for about 13 years, there is no information as to why the hotel was closed. All of the furniture remains and it looks as if everyone there simply left. There are rumors that the hotel is haunted. According to urban explorers who frequent the spooky site, cameras malfunction, sounds can be heard throughout the premises and items seem to move around the hotel by themselves.

THESE PICTURES LOOK LIKE A NANCY DREW GAME

2:57pm July 22, 2014

anythingaladdin:

Disney Heroines 

By: gariSK

2:53pm July 22, 2014

amroyounes:

The Most Creative Business Cards Ever.

  1. Toy Chair Business Card
  2. Miniature Plumber’s Plunger With Contact Information
  3. Seed Packet Business Card
  4. Bike Multi-Tool Business Card
  5. Classic Rock Theme Business Card: This groovy hair salon comb plays a classic rock theme when rubbed by fingernail, using the same principle as a musicbox comb. 
  6. Transformable Cargo Box Business Card
2:51pm July 22, 2014
Anonymous asked: I'm starting a newsies-era rp, and while I do know quite a few things about it, I was wondering if it would be okay to ask for some links about life/people/events in the 1900s, preferably New York?
2:48pm July 22, 2014

theartofmtg:

Archetype of Imagination || Robbie Trevino

12:27am July 22, 2014

lorca-the-great:

After not winning anything at the cosplay pagent at GaymerX2 (bullshit) I undertook the task of putting my Garrett cosplay on my mannequin.

So HERE have some epic detail shots!

12:25am July 22, 2014
ilovereadingandwriting:

dead poets (via Find Your Own Voice)

ilovereadingandwriting:

dead poets (via Find Your Own Voice)

12:09am July 22, 2014

satdeshret:

silentmania:

satdeshret:

edaigoa:

seraphica:

Gorgeous Leather ‘Wing’ Jewelry by Windfalcon

Oohoho *_*

WANT

WANT. MUST HAVE. MUST HAVE NOW.

Also the person does custom orders.

IBIS WING NECKLACKES

12:06am July 22, 2014

pheylan13:

Shoes, Grommet!

4:11am July 21, 2014
rokusan23:

Tee Fury D: I love them both! How ever did you know I love them both?!Squall x Rinoa Jack x ElsaFORVEVER.

rokusan23:

Tee Fury D: I love them both! How ever did you know I love them both?!

Squall x Rinoa 
Jack x Elsa
FORVEVER.

3:30am July 21, 2014
Anonymous asked: I tried googling this and looking through your tags, but didn't come up with anything. Do you have anything on all-powerful ruling societies in fantasy worlds? Like, a brotherhood or something?

thewritingcafe:

If you’re looking for an entire government, check the government tag on the tags page.

If you’re looking for a society, club, order, organization, etc. that is so powerful that they have several connections and thus control most of the government and the population, read on:

I listed some resources for secret societies here, as a start.

The Name:

There are a lot of options for naming societies like this. Some variations include:

  • The X Society
  • The Society for X
  • The X Order
  • The X Order of Y
  • The Order of X
  • The X Brotherhood
  • The Brotherhood of X
  • The X’s Guild (guilds are specific to medieval times and consist of people involved in the same business or trade)
  • The X of Y
  • The X
  • The X Group
  • The X Union
  • The X League
  • The X Lodge
  • X

There are a lot of variations that you can play around with. Make a list of a few different names for your organization and pick the one that works best.

Members:

Organizations like this are often extremely selective when it comes to letting people in. They have to keep their power and bringing in someone who might ruin something or who might be a spy could destroy the organization.

Come up with qualifications for who can join and then come up with an initiation. Most organizations have them, whether it’s a ceremony, a test, or some kind of right of passage. It’s also common for the children of members to join, since they have the most connections and can be among the most trusted.

Visibility:

How visible is this society in your world? Is it well known? If so, is it feared? Respected? If this society is a secret, is it completely unknown to the general public or are there rumors about it? Do people within the actual government all know? Or just a few people?

Power:

You need a reason for why this group is powerful. They might have money, or a magical artifact, or magic in general, or powerful members. Whatever it is, it needs to be present and they need to use this power in the story.

If they are in charge, but are not the primary government, they’ll need manipulation over the government and they’ll need a way to keep it that way. If they have money, they might be paying off government employees or they might make threats against people or they might blackmail them. It depends on how your society works. Their power can go beyond the government too. They might have connections to businesses and others who can help them get any needed materials.

Their power needs to be evident enough that others will not try to challenge them. It should be difficult to overthrow a society like this. If it’s not difficult, then this society is not all that powerful.

Once you have established this society’s connections and power, you need to think about what they can do to alter their world. Do they have great influence in the government? Or do they actually make all the decisions while using others, such as those within the government, as the “face” of their laws, changes, etc.?

3:30am July 21, 2014

“Try not to feel jealous about things, or other people and what they have. It will make you bitter and kill you inside. Just keep living, and find your own path, and one day you’ll discover your own happiness.”

— Unknown (via onlinecounsellingcollege)